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Martin Luther King Jr Lookalike Spotted At Ravens Game

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Martin Luther King Jr Lookalike Spotted At Ravens Game

Martin Luther King Jr lookalike was spotted at the Ravens game yesterday. The striking resemblance between the two has been a subject of discussion on social media.

Photos of the man from Ravens game has since been making rounds online with people believing that was Martin Luther King Jr reincarnated.

“He definitely could play him in a movie, they look identical,” someone commented. “He looking for Jonathan Majors,” another person joked. “Came back to make sure y’all keep his wife’s name out of your mouth,” someone else added.

Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr.; January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Christian minister, activist, and political philosopher who was one of the most prominent leaders in the civil rights movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.

A Black church leader and a son of early civil rights activist and minister Martin Luther King Sr., King advanced civil rights for people of color in the United States through the use of nonviolent resistance and nonviolent civil disobedience against Jim Crow laws and other forms of discrimination in the United States.

On October 14, 1964, King won the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance. In his final years, he expanded his focus to include opposition towards poverty and the Vietnam War. In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. James Earl Ray, a fugitive from the Missouri State Penitentiary, was convicted of the assassination, though the King family believes he was a scapegoat; the assassination remains the subject of conspiracy theories.

King’s death was followed by national mourning, as well as anger leading to riots in many U.S. cities. King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2003.

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