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How to Help Yourself Today: Tips From a Therapist

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Tips From a Therapist On How To Help Yourself

We know that sometimes you want to give up and close yourself, but still remind you of how important it is to take care of your mental health.

What is better to do and not do when you are sad and worried?

Gotta

Make a list of 10-20 things that make you feel good and switch, like enjoying sports betting, painting, or reading books. Immediately in the moment of the experience itself, you won’t remember what right now can help you. It’s such a karaoke effect: when you go to sing at karaoke, you know exactly what songs you’re going to order, but when they give you a microphone, you forget everything. It’s the same with stress. Make a list in advance and use it when the time is right.

Don’t

Go to zero both at work and in your personal life. Something can always happen that destabilizes you. Leave yourself some resources: eat well, take care of your sleep, and control the amount of information you consume. If the people around you are throwing you off, limit your contact with them for a while.

Gotta

Take care of yourself. Make plans for yourself and your family for the future. Talk about where you want to go, what you want to try, and what your goals are.

Don’t

Rush. Give yourself some time to deal with the situation and make the right decision.

Gotta

Allow yourself to experience all feelings one by one or all at once. Don’t be afraid to react inadequately. All of your emotions-fear, excitement, joy, sadness, hiccups are normal and acceptable. So don’t let anyone manipulate you and tell you that there is something wrong with your feelings.

Don’t

Condemn and discuss how others experience stress. Each person has their own magical forest in which they fight unseen battles. Don’t jump to conclusions about other people, don’t try to change someone’s mind, and don’t devalue what they see, hear, and how they feel.

Gotta

Be less demanding of yourself. Your head spends a lot of time analyzing information and finding new ways to solve a problem. Therefore, normal amounts of memory, energy, and sensitivity may not be available yet. Count on only 50-70% of your resources at this point.

Don’t

Do more than one thing at a time. For example, don’t look at your phone while crossing the road, while also figuring things out with someone. Most likely, all these activities will not end well.

Gotta

Get to know yourself. There are some people who, in turbulent situations, become very demanding, whiny or angry. Think back or ask those around you: “What am I like when I’m stressed?” The more characteristics you gather, the easier it will be for you when you find yourself stressed but not aware of it. You will know by these qualities that you are in a state of anxiety.

Don’t

Experience shame or any other negative feelings when you say “sorry, I’m tired” or “sorry, I don’t want to talk about it now, I want to rest”.

Gotta

Decide what is important to you in communication with people close to you: to stay in touch or to prove your point. If it’s the former, don’t argue and set boundaries. You can say “I haven’t figured it out yet” or “I really want to help and support you, but at the moment I’m worried.” Be open to dialogue, but don’t impose your opinion.

Don’t

Question your loved one’s decision. This can destabilize your relationship and the person himself. Accept and support him. Give him back his right to be mature and decisive.

Remember that in your life there have been many ambiguous situations, but all were able to cope well enough. Collect a personal piggy bank of positive experience: remember all the moments that once seemed insurmountable and very scary. You have already overcome them. This will give you strength and confidence.

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